Boeing 737 Military version

Boeing 737 BBJ M53-01 Malaysian Government

 

The Boeing 737 is a popular short-to-medium range commercial passenger jet aircraft, with a few military users and is continuously manufactured by Boeing Commercial Airplane since 1967. Over 5.000 have been sold since its introduction in 1967, more than any other commercial airliner.

Military variants

  • Boeing T-43                         navigation trainer of the United States Air Force.
  • Boeing 737-200 Surveiller     maritime reconnaissance variant.
  • Boeing 737SP                     special mission the aircraft is capable of performing the following missions: Signal Intelligence (SIGINT), Image Intelligence (IMINT), Tactical Electronic Support, Maritime Patrol, and Airborne Early Warning (AEW) and Control.
  • Boeing C-40A                       passenger/freighter.
  • 737-700IGW                         increased gross weight (IGW) aircraft with the Northrop Grumman Multi-role Electronically Scanned Array (MESA) radar (project Wedge tail).
  • Boeing P-8A                         Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft.

Boeing T-43

The T-43 based on the 737-200 was originally procured for the navigation training role, with a cabin given over to navigator stations. Some aircraft were subsequently converted for transport use, and the type redesignated CT-43 to reflect the new tasking.

Boeing 737-200 Surveiller

The main features of this maritime reconnaissance variant are two blade antennas on the upper fuselage forward of the fin, each 4,87 meter in length. These serve a Motorola SLAMMR (side-looking airborne modular multi-mission radar. Which can spot a small ship in heavy seas at a range of 185 km from an altitude of 9.150 meters. Three are in services with the Indonesian Air Force.

Boeing 737-200 special mission

The Boeing 737-200 Special Mission is capable of performing the following missions: Signal Intelligence (SIGINT), Image Intelligence (IMINT), Tactical Electronic Support, Maritime Patrol, and Airborne Early Warning (AEW) and Control.

Operator stations to operate the multi-mission systems have been installed onboard the aircraft:

  •     SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and Electro-Optical exploitation station.
  •     Maritime Patrol Radar operator station.
  •     Electronic Intelligence (ELINT) and Electronic Support Measures (ESM) workstation.
  •     Communication Intelligence (COMINT) and Communication Support Measures (CSM) workstation
  •     Airborne Early Warning (AEW) operator station.

Final development stages and a certification of the “Flight Guard” system are due to be completed within a short period of time, which will make the “Flight Guard” system the first Aircraft Self-protection System for commercial aircraft. The military version of this system is already installed in airplanes and helicopters of various air forces throughout the world.

IAI’s Bedek Aviation Group performed the installations and certification of the aircraft. IAI’s Engineering Division performed the aircraft’s engineering modifications.

Boeing C-40A Clipper

The BBJ’s airframe also forms the basis for the convertible passenger/freighter variant of the 700, the 737-700QC, which has been ordered by the US Navy as the C-40A Clipper (to replace the Douglas DC-9 based C-9B). The C-40 first flew on April 17, 2000. The naval aircraft can be converted to carry 121 passengers, or 3 pallets of cargo plus 70 passengers, or 8 pallets of cargo only. The 737-700C variant features a 3,35 x 2,13 m cargo door on the right side of the aircraft and cargo handling systems in the cabin and a strengthened floor. These aircraft are currently (2002) based at Naval Air Station Fort Worth, Texas (VR-59) and Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida (VR-58).

Project Wedge tail 

The AEW&C system combines the new high-performance Boeing 737-700 increased gross weight (IGW) aircraft with the Northrop Grumman Multi-role Electronically Scanned Array (MESA) radar. Included in the platform are an advanced identification friend or foe (IFF) system; an expanded, passive surveillance system; a flexible, open-system architecture and a highly effective self-defense capability.

Using the latest sensor technology, Northrop Grumman’s 360-degree steer able beam MESA radar is able to track air and sea targets simultaneously and can help the operator track high-performance aircraft while continuously scanning the operational area. More than 1500 hours of wind tunnel testing have demonstrated the compatibility of the aircraft and the radar.

The Boeing team was awarded an Initial Design Activity contract by the Australian Defence Force in December 1997. As part of that contract, the team worked on a design solution to meet the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) requirements for an AEW&C system. In July 1999, the Boeing team was selected as the preferred tenderer for Project Wedge tail. A development and acquisition contract was signed in December 2000. It provides for four 737 AEW&C systems with options for up to three additional systems. The contract also provides for ground-based support segments for flight and mission crew training, a mission support segment and other system support facilities and spare parts. The first two aircraft are expected to be delivered to the Commonwealth of Australia in 2006.

Boeing P-8A Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft

The Boeing P-8A Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft (MMA) combines superior performance and reliability with an advanced mission system that ensures maximum interoperability in the future battle space. A derivative of the Next-Generation 737-800, the P-8A is being developed for the U.S. Navy by a Boeing-led industry team that consists of CFM International, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and Smiths Aerospace.

P-8A is a long-range anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance aircraft capable of broad-area, maritime and littoral operations. The Navy plans to purchase 108 P-8As to replace its fleet of P-3 aircraft. The Boeing-led team, which includes CFM International, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and Smiths Aerospace, will produce five test aircraft during the program’s System Development and Demonstration phase. The first aircraft will be delivered for flight test in 2009 and initial operational capability is slated for 2013.

Developing nation: United States of America.
Manufacturer/designer: Boeing Commercial Airplane Company.
Production line: Renton Municipal Airport, WA.
Type aircraft: Short to medium range airliner.
First flight: – 737-100 April 9, 1967, N73700.
– 737-200 August 8, 1967, N9001U.
– 737-200C September 18, 1968.
– 737-200Adv April 15, 1971.
– 737-300 February 24, 1984, N350AU.
– 737-400 February 19, 1988, N73700.
– 737-500 June 30, 1989, N73700.
– 737-600 January 22, 1998, N7376.
– 737-700 February 9, 1997, N737X.
– 737-800 July 31, 1997, N737BX.
– 737-900 September 2000, N737X.
First delivery: – 737-100 December 28, 1967 to Lufthansa.
– 737-200 December 29, 1967 to United Airlines.
– 737-200C October 30, 1968 to Wien Consolidated.
– 737-200Adv May 20, 1971 to All Nippon Airways.
– 737-300 November 28, 1984 to USAir.
– 737-400 September 15, 1988 to Piedmont.
– 737-500 February 28, 1990 to Southwest.
– 737-600 August, 1998 to SAS.
– 737-700 December 17, 1997 to Southwest.
– 737-800 April 22, 1998 to Hapag Lloyd.
– 737-900 May 16, 2001 to Alaska Airlines.
Last delivery: – 737-100 July 26, 1973 to NASA.
– 737-200 April 5, 71 to Indian Airlines.
– 737-200C July 5, 1985 to Markair.
– 737-200Adv August 8, 1988 to Xiamen Airlines.
– 737-300 December 17, 1999 to Air New Zealand.
– 737-400 February 25, 2000 to CSA Czech Airlines.
– 737-500 July 26, 1999 to Air Nippon.
Boeing 737 built of each type:
–     30 Boeing 737-100
– 1095 Boeing 737-200
–     19 Boeing T-43A
– 1113 Boeing 737-300
–   486 Boeing 737-400
–   389 Boeing 737-500
–     57 Boeing 737-600
–   704 Boeing 737-700
–   855 Boeing 737-800
–     46 Boeing 737-900
Boeing 737-100 military operators:
NASA. – 1 737-100

Summary April 2005.

Boeing 737-200 military operators:
USAF. – 19 T-43A
Indian Air Force. – 6 737-2A8
Brazilian Air Force. – 2 737-2N3
Indonesian Air Force. – 6 737-2X9
– 2 737-2N3
Iranian Government. – 1 737-286
Mexican Air Force. – 1 737-2B7
Nigerian Government. – 1 737-2N9C
Venezuelan Air Force. – 1 737-2N1

Summary April 2005.

Boeing 737-300 military operators:
Mexican Air Force. – 2 737-300
Chilean Air Force. – 1 737-300
Government of Madagascar. – 1 737-300
South Korean Air Force. – 1 737-300

Summary April 2005.

Boeing 737-400 military operators:
Royal Thai Air Force. – 1 737-400
Thai Government. – 1 737-400

Summary April 2005.

Boeing 737-500 military operators:
Chilean Air Force. – 1 737-500
Peruvian Air Force. – 1 737-500

Summary April 2005.

Boeing 737-600 military operator:
US Navy. – 1 737-600

Summary April 2005.

Boeing 737-700 military operators:
US Navy. – 4 C-40A
– 4 C-40A Clipper
USAF. – 3 737 BBJ
– 2 C-40C
Royal Australian Air Force. – 3 737 BBJ
– 1 737 Wedge tail (3 on order)
Saudi Ministry of Finance and Economy. – 2 737-BBJ
Abu Dhabi Amiri Flight. – 1 737-700
Colombian Government. – 1 737 BBJ
Dubai Air Wing/Royal Flight. – 1 737 BBJ
Equatorial Guinea Government. – 1 737 BBJ
Jordanian Government. – 1 737 BBJ
Nigeria Government. – 1 737 BBJ
Republic of Tunisia. – 1 737 BBJ
Royal Malaysian Air Force. – 1 737 BBJ
Royal Saudi Air Force. – 1 737 BBJ
Senegal Government. – 1 737 BBJ
South African Air Force. – 1 737 BBJ
United Arab Emirates Government. – 1 737 BBJ

Summary April 2005.

Boeing 737-800/BBJ2 military operators:
Dubai Air Wing / Royal Flight. – 2 737 BBJ2
Belarus Government. – 1 737 BBJ2
Royal Saudi Air Force. – 1 737 BBJ2
Taiwan Air Force. – 1 737-800
Turkish Air Force. – 1 737 BBJ2
United Arab Emirates Government. – 1 737 BBJ2

 

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